Thursday, February 20, 2020

"We Tracked Iran's Covert Military Unit on Social Media, Here's What We Found | Visual Investigations

Before his killing, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani of Iran was everywhere. His persona is a clue into how the elite Quds Force he commanded operates.

Which Automakers Can Seriously Challenge Tesla?

Several major automakers are making big bets on electric vehicles. A few vehicles have been released so far, but sales indicate any one of them has failed to make a significant dent in Tesla’s share of the EV market. So, who are they? And how much of a chance do they have?

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Rus trollerine karşı Litvanya elfleri - DW Türkçe

Elfler, trollere karşı. Bu bir masal değil, aksine gerçek. Yaklaşık 30 yıl önce Sovyetler'den bağımsızlığını kazanmış Litvanya, diğer küçük Baltık devletleri gibi sık sık Rusya kaynaklı dezenformasyon kampanyalarına maruz kalıyor. Bu durumdan rahatsız olan binlerce Litvanyalı gönüllü, Rus trolleri ile internette mücadele ediyor. Boş zamanlarında Rus trollerin yaymaya çalıştığı yalan haberleri ifşa edip düzelterek doğrusunu yaymaya çalışıyorlar. Kendilerine Elfler adını veren bu anonim gönüllülerin sayısı 1000'i aşıyor.

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

How ads follow you around the internet

Hint: It’s why every site asks you to accept cookies. Join the Open Sourced Reporting Network: http://www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork You’ve seen the pop-ups: “This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Please accept cookies.” Cookies do improve your experience. They function as the website’s short term memory; with each new click you make, cookies help the site identify you as the same person. Imagine every time you add something to your cart and click away, it disappears. Or each time you load a new page on Facebook, you have to log in again. Without cookies, the online world we know today couldn’t exist. But that world relies on advertising, which gives three kinds of companies a strong incentive to track your online behavior. Brands want to sell products by serving you ads for things you’re likely to buy. Platforms and publishers — like Vox — want to make money by serving those ads when you’re on their site. And middlemen are in the business of ensuring the ads from the brands are delivered to the right people. In this video, we explain how cookies work and what you should know about how they’re being used. And we get a little help from the man who invented them. Open Sourced is a year-long reporting project from Recode by Vox that goes deep into the closed ecosystems of data, privacy, algorithms, and artificial intelligence. Learn more at http://www.vox.com/opensourced This project is made possible by the Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists. Watch all episodes of Open Sourced right here on YouTube: http://bit.ly/2tIHftD Become a part of the Open Sourced Reporting Network and help our reporting. Join here: http://www.vox.com/opensourcednetwork Sources: “Online Tracking: A 1-million-site Measurement and Analysis” https://www.cs.princeton.edu/~arvindn... "Why every website wants you to accept its cookies" https://www.vox.com/recode/2019/12/10... “The reasoning behind web cookies” https://montulli.blogspot.com/2013/05... Letter following Facebook Chief Technology Officer testimony before UK House of Commons https://www.parliament.uk/documents/c... “How does online tracking actually work?” https://robertheaton.com/2017/11/20/h... “Now sites can fingerprint you online even when you use multiple browsers” https://arstechnica.com/information-t... “WTF are Facebook’s first-party cookies for pixel?” https://digiday.com/marketing/wtf-wha... “About Cookie Settings for Facebook Pixel” https://www.facebook.com/business/hel... “What information does Facebook get when I visit a site with the Like button?” https://www.facebook.com/help/1863256... Transcript of Mark Zuckerberg’s Senate Hearing https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/t... “Facebook Is Tracking Me Even Though I’m Not on Facebook” https://www.aclu.org/blog/privacy-tec... Internet History Podcast Interview with Lou Montulli http://www.internethistorypodcast.com... Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.

Monday, February 3, 2020

Google Maps Hacks by Simon Weckert

99 smartphones are transported in a handcart to generate virtual traffic jam in Google Maps.Through this activity, it is possible to turn a green street red which has an impact in the physical world by navigating cars on another route to avoid being stuck in traffic. #googlemapshacks

Saturday, January 18, 2020

It’s not you. Phones are designed to be addicting.

The 3 design elements that make smartphones so hard to put down, explained by Google’s former design ethicist. Check out Christophe's video on how designers find inspiration in nature: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Read Ezra Klein's full interview with Tristan Harris: http://bit.ly/2og5v0H Read our interview with Catherine Price: http://bit.ly/2C8gxsT Batch notification research by the Center for Advanced Hindsight, Duke University & Synapse Inc Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Today’s phones are hard to put down. Push notifications buzz in your pocket, red bubbles demand attention, and endless distractions sit at your fingertips. It can feel impossible to pull away from. But that’s kind of the point. When people talk about the “attention economy,” they’re referring to the fact that your time and attention are the currency on which today’s applications make money. Because apps profit off of the total time you spend on their platform, there’s a strong incentive to use psychological tricks to keep you endlessly hooked. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Tristan Harris, who runs Time Well Spent, is working to create a world where platforms can more honestly respect their users’ time. By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Stay tuned for more, and check out Christophe's most recent work exploring design in our Vox + 99% Invisible collaboration: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... The 3 design elements that make smartphones so hard to put down, explained by Google’s former design ethicist. Check out Christophe's video on how designers find inspiration in nature: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Read Ezra Klein's full interview with Tristan Harris: http://bit.ly/2og5v0H Read our interview with Catherine Price: http://bit.ly/2C8gxsT Batch notification research by the Center for Advanced Hindsight, Duke University & Synapse Inc Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Today’s phones are hard to put down. Push notifications buzz in your pocket, red bubbles demand attention, and endless distractions sit at your fingertips. It can feel impossible to pull away from. But that’s kind of the point. When people talk about the “attention economy,” they’re referring to the fact that your time and attention are the currency on which today’s applications make money. Because apps profit off of the total time you spend on their platform, there’s a strong incentive to use psychological tricks to keep you endlessly hooked. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Tristan Harris, who runs Time Well Spent, is working to create a world where platforms can more honestly respect their users’ time. By Design is a new Vox video series about the intersection of design and technology, hosted by Christophe Haubursin. Stay tuned for more, and check out Christophe's most recent work exploring design in our Vox + 99% Invisible collaboration: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... The 3 design elements that make smartphones so hard to put down, explained by Google’s former design ethicist. Check out Christophe's video on how designers find inspiration in nature: http://bit.ly/2DDIQAL Read Ezra Klein's full interview with Tristan Harris: http://bit.ly/2og5v0H Read our interview with Catherine Price: http://bit.ly/2C8gxsT Batch notification research by the Center for Advanced Hindsight, Duke University & Synapse Inc